JUNE 2018 EXHIBITION


9 June - 8 July 2018

 

EXHIBITION OPENING
SATURDAY 9 JUNE FROM 4:30 PM

 

Alignment: Chaotic Neutral
MARK RODDA

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Misty Morning
GREG WOOD

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Being Buoyant
LUCY FAHEY

MARK RODDA
Fictile Aggregation . 2018
synthetic polymer on linen . 84 x 76 cm

Alignment: Chaotic Neutral
MARK RODDA

Melbourne-based artist Mark Rodda creates both abstract and figurative paintings. This work often features combinations of both painterly and geometric forms, and more recently incorporating thick impasto paint to form shallow 3D/relief elements within the composition. Rodda’s figurative paintings usually take the form of romantic or magical landscapes – fabricated worlds, often uninhabited, sometimes stages for interactions between people, animals, or enchanted entities.

Alignment: Chaotic Neutral explores the classic role-playing game Dungeons and Dragons, its layered narratives and the moral choices and personalities of the many characters within it. Examining the grand scheme of his exhibition experience and oeuvre, Rodda sees himself in this context more as an actor, or the director of a movie, as opposed to someone who is exposing their true soul. Some of his exhibitions are clean and neat, some are brash, some subtle. ‘Chaotic neutral’ is the theme for this group of paintings in which Rodda has decided that "WHIM IS KING” whilst using 'neutrality' to signify that he doesn’t have, and has never had, any inclination to teach any moral, social, scientific, or philosophical lessons to the viewer.

LUCY FAHEY . Being Buoyant (detail). 2018 . animation . 25 second loop

Being Buoyant
LUCY FAHEY

Illustrator Lucy Fahey's work Being Buoyant features an animation that has been developed from of a series of illustrations Fahey made for an ABC News story documenting journalist Britta Jorgensen’s experience of caring for her father who has Parkinson’s disease. Britta describes in the story how her dad’s disease has isolated her parents:

It's like their whole world has been caught in a rip, and mum won't let go of dad, so they've been pulled out together.

The image Fahey made for Britta’s story was of two figures cast out to sea. It’s unclear in the image as to whether the figures are in struggle or peacefully floating, but it’s a decidedly melancholy picture. The image Britta’s words conjured resonated strongly with Fahey. In the months after she lost her own father to illness last year, Fahey took refuge in the sea, swimming and surfing - being immersed in the water felt therapeutic. This animated version of the original illustration shows a lone figure floating, with life of all kinds moving around it. The two versions tell a narrative of illness and grief and eventual relief.